Utah Hiking

One downside to dispersed camping is site security. When on a walk I’m always wondering if my stuff will be unmolested when I return.

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Climbing the trail from the campground

A paid campsite removes most of that worry, especially if I chat with the camp hosts and they can see my things from their site.

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I admit that the path gets a bit too narrow for my comfort when next to some steep and deep drop-offs

It’s also wonderful to have a real, honest to goodness foot trailhead not far from me, connected to the campground. OHV use is forbidden so I don’t get covered with dust on my way there. The trail itself is not much better than a mountain goat path as shown in the photo above. Narrow, loose sand and rocks, but perfectly fine for its intended purpose: hiking. On foot. Thank God. It feels so good after all the forest service roads I’ve trekked.

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An iconic Utah scene

So quiet, no dust clouds or exhaust fumes, no wheeled maniacs, motorized or not, overtaking me every five minutes and forcing me off to the side. On a weekday I can walk an hour or four without encountering another soul. This is heaven.

I need more of this, even though it’ll cost money to camp next to good trails. It’s worth it!